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  1. 6 THE TURN OF THE SCREW He laughed for the first time. “You are acute. Yes, she was in love. That is, she had been. That came out— she couldn’t tell her story without its coming out. I saw it, and she saw I saw it; but neither of us spoke of it. I remember the time and the place— the corner of the lawn, the shade of the

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  2. 1 de fev. de 1995 · The Turn of the Screw by Henry James Read now or download (free!) Similar Books Readers also downloaded… In Opera In Best Books Ever Listings In Horror In Gothic Fiction About this eBook Free kindle book and epub digitized and proofread by volunteers.

    • Henry James
    • English
    • 1898
    • The Turn of the Screw
    • HENRY JAMES
    • [The text is taken from the first American appearance of this book.]
    • “Well then,” I said, “just sit right down and begin.”
    • “Yes; if I do—?”
    • II
    • At this, with one of the quick turns of simple folk, she suddenly flamed up. “Master Miles! HIM an injury?”
    • On reflection I accepted this. “You mean that a boy who never is—?”
    • III
    • IV
    • “A horror?”
    • She visibly tried to hold herself. “But he IS handsome?”
    • “Quint?”
    • “Yes. You must know now. Did I look very queer?”
    • She could only look at me harder. “Do you mean he’s a stranger?”
    • “A horror?”
    • She visibly tried to hold herself. “But he IS handsome?”
    • “Quint?”
    • VI
    • “But how do you know?”
    • got hold of Mrs. Grose as soon after this as I could; and I can give no intelligible account of how
    • “From where they come from! She just appeared and stood there—but not so near.” “And without coming nearer?”
    • She turned right and left in her distress. “How can you be sure?”
    • “It’s only then to spare you.”
    • “With them all.”
    • “Then you do know what she died of?” I asked.
    • VIII
    • “Wouldn’t YOU?”
    • HIM—”
    • IX
    • XI
    • “And when did you go down?”
    • XII
    • “On the part of little darlings—?”
    • “For the children to come?”
    • XIII
    • XIV
    • He resumed our walk with me, passing his hand into my arm. “Then when AM I going back?”
    • XV
    • XVI
    • XVII
    • I felt that I didn’t know so well as Miles, and I took temporary refuge. “You want to go to your uncle?”
    • XVIII
    • XIX
    • XX
    • XXI
    • “Yes, miss; but to WHAT end?”
    • The look she gave me with it made me jump at possibilities. “You mean that, since yesterday, you HAVE seen—?”
    • XXII
    • XXIII
    • XXIV
    • “Only that?”
    • “But to whom did you say them?”

    OPEN PRESS DEU, UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN SASKATOON This work (The Turn of the Screw by Henry James) is free of known copyright restrictions. This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and withalmost no restrictions

    The EBook of The Turn of the Screw, by Henry James is available in the public domain. Title: The Turn of the Screw Author: Henry James Release Date: April 29, 2016 Language: English Produced by Kristine Dreaver-Charles, M.Sc.Ed. Open Press Distance Education Unit (DEU) University of Saskatchewan The Turn of the Screw The story had held us, round th...

    He turned round to the fire, gave a kick to a log, watched it an instant. Then as he faced us again: “I can’t begin. I shall have to send to town.” There was a unanimous groan at this, and much reproach; after which, in his preoccupied way, he explained. “The story’s written. It’s in a locked drawer—it has not been out for years. I could write to m...

    “You WILL be carried away by the little gentleman!” “Well, that, I think, is what I came for—to be carried away. I’m afraid, however,” I remember feeling the impulse to add, “I’m rather easily carried away. I was carried away in London!” I can still see Mrs. Grose’s broad face as she took this in. “In Harley Street?” “In Harley Street.” “Well, miss...

    This came home to me when, two days later, I drove over with Flora to meet, as Mrs. Grose said, the little gentleman; and all the more for an incident that, presenting itself the second evening, had deeply disconcerted me. The first day had been, on the whole, as I have expressed, reassuring; but I was to see it wind up in keen apprehension. The po...

    There was such a flood of good faith in it that, though I had not yet seen the child, my very fears made me jump to the absurdity of the idea. I found myself, to meet my friend the better, offering it, on the spot, sarcastically. “To his poor little innocent mates!” “It’s too dreadful,” cried Mrs. Grose, “to say such cruel things! Why, he’s scarce ...

    “Is no boy for ME!” I held her tighter. “You like them with the spirit to be naughty?” Then, keeping pace with her answer, “So do I!” I eagerly brought out. “But not to the degree to contaminate—” “To contaminate?”—my big word left her at a loss. I explained it. “To corrupt.” She stared, taking my meaning in; but it produced in her an odd laugh. “A...

    Her thus turning her back on me was fortunately not, for my just preoccupations, a snub that could check the growth of our mutual esteem. We met, after I had brought home little Miles, more intimately than ever on the ground of my stupefaction, my general emotion: so monstrous was I then ready to pronounce it that such a child as had now been revea...

    It was not that I didn’t wait, on this occasion, for more, for I was rooted as deeply as I was shaken. Was there a “secret” at Bly—a mystery of Udolpho or an insane, an unmentionable relative kept in unsuspected confinement? I can’t say how long I turned it over, or how long, in a confusion of curiosity and dread, I remained where I had had my coll...

    “He’s—God help me if I know WHAT he is!” Mrs. Grose looked round once more; she fixed her eyes on the duskier distance, then, pulling herself together, turned to me with abrupt inconsequence. “It’s time we should be at church.” “Oh, I’m not fit for church!” “Won’t it do you good?” “It won’t do THEM—! I nodded at the house. “The children?” “I can’t ...

    I saw the way to help her. “Remarkably!” “And dressed—?” “In somebody’s clothes.” “They’re smart, but they’re not his own.” She broke into a breathless affirmative groan: “They’re the master’s!” I caught it up. “You DO know him?” She faltered but a second. “Quint!” she cried.

    “Peter Quint—his own man, his valet, when he was here!” “When the master was?” Gaping still, but meeting me, she pieced it all together. “He never wore his hat, but he did wear—well, there were waistcoats missed. They were both here—last year. Then the master went, and Quint was alone.” I followed, but halting a little. “Alone?” “Alone with US.” Th...

    “Through this window? Dreadful!” “Well,” I said, “I’ve been frightened.” Mrs. Grose’s eyes expressed plainly that SHE had no wish to be, yet also that she knew too well her place not to be ready to share with me any marked inconvenience. Oh, it was quite settled that she MUST share! “Just what you saw from the dining room a minute ago was the effec...

    “Oh, very much!” “Yet you didn’t tell me?” “No—for reasons. But now that you’ve guessed—” Mrs. Grose’s round eyes encountered this charge. “Ah, I haven’t guessed!” she said very simply. “How can I if YOU don’t imagine?” “I don’t in the very least.” “You’ve seen him nowhere but on the tower?” “And on this spot just now.” Mrs. Grose looked round agai...

    “He’s—God help me if I know WHAT he is!” Mrs. Grose looked round once more; she fixed her eyes on the duskier distance, then, pulling herself together, turned to me with abrupt inconsequence. “It’s time we should be at church.” “Oh, I’m not fit for church!” “Won’t it do you good?” “It won’t do THEM—! I nodded at the house. “The children?” “I can’t ...

    I saw the way to help her. “Remarkably!” “And dressed—?” “In somebody’s clothes.” “They’re smart, but they’re not his own.” She broke into a breathless affirmative groan: “They’re the master’s!” I caught it up. “You DO know him?” She faltered but a second. “Quint!” she cried.

    “Peter Quint—his own man, his valet, when he was here!” “When the master was?” Gaping still, but meeting me, she pieced it all together. “He never wore his hat, but he did wear—well, there were waistcoats missed. They were both here—last year. Then the master went, and Quint was alone.” I followed, but halting a little. “Alone?” “Alone with US.” Th...

    It took of course more than that particular passage to place us together in presence of what we had now to live with as we could—my dreadful liability to impressions of the order so vividly exemplified, and my companion’s knowledge, henceforth—a knowledge half consternation and half compassion—of that liability. There had been, this evening, after ...

    “I know, I know, I know!” My exaltation grew. “And YOU know, my dear!” She didn’t deny this, but I required, I felt, not even so much telling as that. She resumed in a moment, at any rate: “What if HE should see him?” “Little Miles? That’s what he wants!” She looked immensely scared again. “The child?” “Heaven forbid! The man. He wants to appear to...

    fought out the interval. Yet I still hear myself cry as I fairly threw myself into her arms: “They KNOW—it’s too monstrous: they know, they know!” “And what on earth—?” I felt her incredulity as she held me. “Why, all that WE know—and heaven knows what else besides!” Then, as she released me, I made it out to her, made it out perhaps only now with ...

    “Oh, for the effect and the feeling, she might have been as close as you!” My friend, with an odd impulse, fell back a step. “Was she someone you’ve never seen?” “Yes. But someone the child has. Someone YOU have.” Then, to show how I had thought it all out: “My predecessor—the one who died.” “Miss Jessel?” “Miss Jessel. You don’t believe me?” I pre...

    This drew from me, in the state of my nerves, a flash of impatience. “Then ask Flora—SHE’S sure!” But I had no sooner spoken than I caught myself up. “No, for God’s sake, DON’T! She’ll say she isn’t—she’ll lie!” Mrs. Grose was not too bewildered instinctively to protest. “Ah, how CAN you?” “Because I’m clear. Flora doesn’t want me to know.”

    “No, no—there are depths, depths! The more I go over it, the more I see in it, and the more I see in it, the more I fear. I don’t know what I DON’T see—what I DON’T fear!” Mrs. Grose tried to keep up with me. “You mean you’re afraid of seeing her again?” “Oh, no; that’s nothing—now!” Then I explained. “It’s of NOT seeing her.” But my companion only...

    It was as if now in my friend’s own eyes Miss Jessel had again appeared. I seemed at any rate, for an instant, to see their evocation of her as distinctly as I had seen her by the pond; and I brought out with decision: “It must have been also what SHE wished!” Mrs. Grose’s face signified that it had been indeed, but she said at the same time: “Poor...

    “No—I know nothing. I wanted not to know; I was glad enough I didn’t; and I thanked heaven she was well out of this!” “Yet you had, then, your idea—” “Of her real reason for leaving? Oh, yes—as to that. She couldn’t have stayed. Fancy it here—for a governess! And afterward I imagined—and I still imagine. And what I imagine is dreadful.” “Not so dre...

    What I had said to Mrs. Grose was true enough: there were in the matter I had put before her depths and possibilities that I lacked resolution to sound; so that when we met once more in the wonder of it we were of a common mind about the duty of resistance to extravagant fancies. We were to keep our heads if we should keep nothing else—difficult in...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

    He evidently tried to remember, but it dropped—he had lost it. “I don’t know!” He almost smiled at me in the desolation of his surrender, which was indeed practically, by this time, so complete that I ought to have left it there. But I was infatuated—I was blind with victory, though even then the very effect that was to have brought him so much nea...

  3. 1 de ago. de 2021 · Download the classic ghost story by Henry James, The Turn of the Screw, for free from the Internet Archive. Read the novella online or print it out, and explore its themes, characters, and interpretations.

  4. Book Source: Digital Library of India Item 2015.95031dc.contributor.author: James, Henrydc.date.accessioned: 2015-07-01T14:49:38Zdc.date.available:...

  5. The turn of the screw by Henry James, Jr. Publication date 1991 Topics Governesses -- Fiction., Children -- Fiction., England -- Fiction. Publisher Dover Publications Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; internetarchivebooks Contributor Internet Archive Language English Access-restricted-item true Addeddate 2011-12-01 20:10:44 Boxid IA174601

  6. 10 de abr. de 2023 · The Turn of the Screw (Boston: Le Roy Phillips, 1917) — Part of the first American issue of "The Uniform Tales of Henry James"; follows the "New York Edition" text "The Turn of the Screw" in The Aspern Papers, The Turn of the Screw, The Liar, The Two Faces (London: Macmillan & Co., 1922): 129–277.