Yahoo Search Busca da Web

Resultado da Busca

  1. Field Marshal Sir William Robert Robertson, 1st Baronet, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, DSO (29 January 1860 – 12 February 1933) was a British Army officer who served as Chief of the Imperial General Staff (CIGS) – the professional head of the British Army – from 1916 to 1918 during the First World War.

  2. 4 de abr. de 2024 · Sir William Robert Robertson, 1st Baronet was a field marshal and the chief of the British Imperial General Staff during most of World War I. He supported Sir Douglas Haig, the British commander in chief in France, in urging concentration of Britain’s manpower and matériel on the Western Front.

  3. 3 de nov. de 2023 · Sir William Robert Robertson is the only person in the history of the British Army to have held every rank between private and field marshal in his military career. Born in 1860 to a Lincolnshire family, Robertson began as a humble footman but decided against a life of servitude and pursued a career in the Army.

  4. Sir William Robertson (1860-1933) holds the unusual distinction of being the only man to rise from Private to Field Marshal rank in the British army. Having enlisted at the age of 17 as a Private, Robertson joined the 16th Lancers in November 1877, starting his remarkable ascent ten years later when he was made an NCO.

  5. Sir William Robertson was Chief of the Imperial General Staff from 1916 to 1918 but during his career he had hardly ever commanded troops in the field. His command of the army during World War One was criticised for his failure to visit the men on the battlefields of the Western Front.

  6. Chief of the Imperial General Staff. Born 29 January 1860 in Welbourn, Great Britain. Died 12 February 1933 in London, Great Britain. William Robert Robertson was the first British soldier to advance from private to field marshal.

  7. 8 de dez. de 2011 · 62. 13K views 12 years ago. Justin Saddington, Curator of Printed Books at the National Army Museum, discusses the life of Field Marshal Sir William Robertson and the themes of late Victorian...