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  1. Robert Stewart, 2.º Marquês de Londonberry KG GCH PC PC (Ire) ( Dublin, 18 de junho de 1769 – North Cray, 12 de agosto de 1822 ), usualmente conhecido por seu título de cortesia Visconde Castlereagh, foi um político irlandês de britânico.

  2. Robert Stewart, 2.º Marquês de Londonberry KG GCH PC PC , usualmente conhecido por seu título de cortesia Visconde Castlereagh, foi um político irlandês de britânico. Foi o Secretário dos Assuntos Estrangeiros de 1812 a 1822, sendo fundamental na formação da coalizão que derrotou Napoleão Bonaparte e foi o principal diplomata ...

  3. Marquês de Londonderry (pronunciado Lundundry) é um título nobiliárquico do Pariato da Irlanda, criado em 1816. Marqueses de Londonderry Robert Stewart, 1.º Marquês de Londonderry (1739-1821) Robert Stewart, 2.º Marquês de Londonderry (1769-1822) Charles William Vane, 3.º Marquês de Londonderry (1778-1854)

    • Birth and Origins
    • Cowan Inheritance
    • Education and First Marriage
    • Opposition Member of Parliament
    • Second Marriage and Children
    • Irish Volunteer
    • Ascendant Peer
    • 1798, The Execution of James Porter
    • Reputation as Landlord
    • Death, Succession, and Timeline

    Robert was born on 27 September 1739, at Mount Stewart, the eldest son of Alexander Stewart and his wife Mary Cowan. His father was an alderman of Derry in 1760, and his grandfather, Colonel William Stewart, had commanded one of the two companies of Protestant soldiers that Derry admitted into its walls when Mountjoy was sent there by Tyrconnell be...

    Within three months of his parents' marriage in 1737, Robert's mother inherited the fortune her half-brother, Robert Cowan, had acquired in service to the East India Company as Governor of Bombay. The legacy allowed Alexander Stewart to retire from the linen trade and buy into the landed gentry. In 1743 he purchased sixty townlands and a large esta...

    Robert Stewart was brought up a Calvinist, sent by his father under the care of a tutor to the University of Geneva, where he studied literature. He thus "temptations of Oxford and similar academic strongholds of the Established Church" to which, as the son landed gentry, he might naturally have been drawn. On his return from the continent, he cour...

    The year following his wife's death Robert Stewart entered the Irish House of Commons as member for County Down filling a vacancy created by the elevation of Bernard Ward to the House of Lords as Baron Bangor.He was returned by the "independent" or "county" interest backed by the local Whigs and by his fellow Presbyterians ("Dissenters" from the Es...

    Robert Stewart remarried, on 7 June 1775, taking for his second wife, Frances Pratt, the independent-minded daughter of the Whig politician Charles Pratt, 1st Earl Camden. From his second marriage he had 11 more children, three sons and eight daughters: 1. Charles William(1778–1854), succeeded him as 3rd Marquess 2. Frances Ann (1777–1810), married...

    Between 1775 and 1783, Robert Stewart lived in Bangor with his wife, while his father was living at Mount Stewart. In 1776, a general election was held in Ireland. Robert Stewart stood again for Down and was re-elected.He sat until the dissolution of this parliament on 25 July 1783. Stewart participated in the Irish Volunteers, the self-armed milit...

    In 1789 Robert Stewart was created Baron Londonderry in the Peerage of Ireland. Unable as a peer to himself avenge his defeat in 1783, for general election of 1790 he took his eldest son, Robert, out of Cambridge University to run for the county. Still able to persuade Down's Forty-shilling freeholders that the Stewarts were the friends of reform, ...

    During their three-day "Republic" in Ards and north Down, 10–13 June 1798, the United Irish insurgents briefly occupied Mount Stewart. In August, the wife of the local Presbyterian minister, James Porter, appeared at the house with her seven children where they overwhelmed Lady Londonderry and young sister, then dying of tuberculosis, with a plea f...

    Despite political differences with his tenants, Londonderry did have a reputation as a comparatively generous landlord. He and his father rarely evicted tenants unless they were more than five years in arrears, and they abided by the Ulster custom of tenant right. They patronised the local town of Newtownards raising a subscription for a Catholic p...

    Lord Londonderry died on 6 April 1821 at Mount Stewart, County Down, and was buried at the Newtownards Priory, where his father already had been laid to rest. He was succeeded briefly as the 2nd Marquess of Londonderry by his eldest son Robert (Castlereagh) who took his own life the following year.

  4. Charles William Vane, 3.º Marquês de Londonderry, KG, GCB, GCH, PC (nascido Charles William Stewart; 1778–1854), foi um nobre anglo-irlandês, soldado e político britânico. Ele serviu nas Guerras Revolucionárias Francesas, na repressão da Rebelião Irlandesa de 1798 e nas Guerras Napoleônicas.

    • Robert Stewart, Frances Stewart
    • 6 de março de 1854 (75 anos), Londres
  5. Robert Stewart, Viscount Castlereagh, British Foreign Secretary, who became the second Marquess of Londonderry in 1821. Marquess of Londonderry, of the County of Londonderry [1] ( / ˈlʌndəndreɪ / LUN-dən-dree ), [2] is a title in the Peerage of Ireland .