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  1. For an introductory guide on IPA symbols, see Help:IPA. Proto-Norse or Proto-North Germanic was an Indo-European language spoken in Scandinavia that is thought to have evolved as a northern dialect of Proto-Germanic in the first centuries CE. It is the earliest stage of a characteristically North Germanic language, and the language attested in ...

  2. Proto-Germanic was originally spoken in the west of Iran (3rd and 2nd millennium BC) I have deciphered Linear Gutian (Old Gothic) and my works have been published in Iran: Amordad Magazine, Vol. 419, Page 6, please read them and correct this article about proto-Germanic language.

  3. Proto-Germanic. All Germanic languages derive from the Proto-Indo-European language (PIE), which is generally thought to have been spoken between 4500 and 2500 BCE. The ancestor of Germanic languages is referred to as Proto- or Common Germanic, and likely represented a group of mutually intelligible dialects.

  4. Frankish ( reconstructed endonym: * Frenkisk ), [6] [7] also known as Old Franconian or Old Frankish, was the West Germanic language spoken by the Franks from the 5th to 9th century. After the Salian Franks settled in Roman Gaul, its speakers in Picardy and Île-de-France were outnumbered by the local populace who spoke Proto-Romance dialects.

  5. Baltic and Germanic languages also share numeral formation for 11 to 19, both partially possess the same formation of verbs in past tense , absence of the aorist. According to German linguist Wolfgang P. Schmid , at first Proto-Baltic was a centum language along with Proto-Germanic, but it eventually became satem later on.

  6. Grimm's law was the first discovered systematic sound change, creating historical phonology as a historical linguistics discipline. Friedrich von Schlegel first noted the correspondence between Latin p and Germanic f in 1806. In 1818, Rasmus Rask extended the correspondences to other Indo-European languages like Sanskrit and Greek and to the ...

  7. Other articles where Proto-Germanic language is discussed: Indo-European languages: Changes in morphology: Proto-Germanic had only six cases, the functions of ablative (place from which) and locative (place in which) being taken over by constructions of preposition plus the dative case. In Modern English these are reduced to two cases in nouns, a general case that does duty…