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  1. From my boyish days I had always felt a great perplexity on one point in Macbeth. It was this: the knocking at the gate, which succeeds to the murder of Duncan, produced to my feelings an effect for which I never could account. The effect was, that it reflected back upon the murderer a peculiar awfulness and a depth of solemnity; yet, however ...

  2. "On the Knocking at the Gate in Macbeth" is an essay in Shakespearean criticism by the English author Thomas De Quincey, first published in the October 1823 edition of The London Magazine. Though brief, less than 2,000 words in length, [1] it has been called "De Quincey's finest single critical piece" [2] and "one of the most ...

    • Thomas De Quincey
    • England
    • 1823
    • English
  3. 11 de nov. de 2020 · De Quincey’s Shakespeare is a wielder of words who informs his masterly command of rhetoric and eloquence with keen insight into the workings of psychology. “On the Knocking at the Gate in Macbeth,” which De Quincey describes as “psychological criticism,” is an exploration into the subjective mechanism of audience response.

  4. Macbeth. ". Thomas De Quincey (1785-1859) was an English essayist and literary critic, best known for his autobiographical Confessions of an English Opium-Eater (1822), and for the short essay, "On the Knocking at the Gate in Macbeth," first published the London Magazine for October 1823. Murder, in ordinary cases, where the sympathy is wholly ...

  5. In the following scene, the audience learns that Macduff has been knocking at the gate and enters Macbeth's estate at Inverness. The knocking itself is ominous and foreboding, which...

  6. Introduction. Thomas De Quincey opens his essay by explaining that he has been deeply moved by a particular moment in William Shakespeare's Macbeth. This emotional response confused De Quincey because he could not explain why the moment stirred him. De Quincey recalls the moment after Macbeth murders Duncan and hears a knock at the castle gate.

  7. In Thomas De Quincey's 1823 essay "On the Knocking at the Gate in Macbeth", he describes the effect of the knocking at the gate (Macbeth, Act II, Scene 3) on him when he was a boy: "it [the knocking] reflected back upon the murderer a peculiar awfulness...". What does he mean by this? Does he admit feeling sympathy for Macbeth?