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  1. James Stuart, Duke of Cambridge KG (12 July 1663 – 20 June 1667) was the second son of the Duke of York (later James II of England) and his first wife, Anne Hyde. In 1664, the infant James became the first Duke of Cambridge and Baron of Dauntsey, titles his uncle, King Charles II, created especially for him.

  2. The first officially recognised creation of the dukedom was in the Peerage of England in 1664, when King Charles II granted the title to his next eldest surviving nephew James Stuart, the infant second son of the Duke of York, who died early in 1667 at the age of three, when the title again became extinct.

  3. 3 de abr. de 2023 · © Unofficial Royalty 2023. James Stuart, Duke of Cambridge; Credit – Wikipedia. James Stuart, Duke of Cambridge was born at St. James’s Palace in London, England on July 12, 1663. He was the third of the eight children and the second of the four sons of the future King James II of England, who was then Duke of York, and his first wife Anne Hyde.

  4. James, Duke of Cambridge: 11 or 12 July 1663 20 June 1667 Anne, Queen of Great Britain: 6 February 1665 1 August 1714 married 1683, Prince George of Denmark; no surviving issue Charles, Duke of Kendal: 4 July 1666 22 May 1667 Edgar, Duke of Cambridge: 14 September 1667 8 June 1671 Henrietta 13 January 1669 15 November 1669 Catherine ...

  5. James Stuart, Duke of Cambridge KG (12 July 1663 – 20 June 1667) was the second son of the Duke of York (later James II of England) and his first wife, Anne Hyde. In 1664, the infant James became the first Duke of Cambridge and Baron of Dauntsey, titles his uncle, King Charles II, created...

  6. 6 de nov. de 2021 · James Stuart: The Man Who Would Never Be King. Born a prince but never crowned, find out more about James Stuart, aka the “Old Pretender”, and his role in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. Nov 6, 2021 • By Sarah Moxey, MSc by Research in Scottish History, MA (Hons) History.

  7. European Paintings. James Stuart (1612–1655), Duke of Richmond and Lennox. Anthony van Dyck Flemish. ca. 1633–35. On view at The Met Fifth Avenue in Gallery 618. Van Dyck depicts the duke of Richmond and Lennox as a paragon of aristocratic self-possession and nonchalance.