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  1. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Connie_MackConnie Mack - Wikipedia

    Centennial Commission. Cornelius McGillicuddy (December 22, 1862 – February 8, 1956), better known as Connie Mack, was an American professional baseball catcher, manager, and team owner. The longest-serving manager in Major League Baseball history, he holds records for wins (3,731), losses (3,948), and games managed (7,755).

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  2. Connie Mack was a legendary manager who led the Philadelphia Athletics for 50 years, assembling two dynasties and winning nine AL pennants and five World Series titles. He was known for his leadership style, his ability to handle young players, and his love for humanity. He was elected to the Hall of Fame in 1937.

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  3. Check out the latest Stats, Height, Weight, Position, Rookie Status & More of Connie Mack. Get info about his position, age, height, weight, draft status, bats, throws, school and more on Baseball-reference.com

    • December 22, 1862
  4. 30 de jan. de 2013 · Connie Mack was a baseball legend who managed the Philadelphia Athletics for 50 years, winning nine American League championships and five World Series titles. He developed young players, sold off stars, and built dynasties with his Hall of Fame career spanning 65 seasons. Learn more about his life, achievements, and legacy.

  5. 22 de dez. de 2010 · Connie Mack is a Hall of Fame manager who led the Philadelphia Athletics to 12 AL pennants and 10 World Series championships from 1894 to 1929. He also won 10 NL pennants and 10 World Series championships with the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1894 to 1920. See his career stats, awards, and achievements on Baseball-Reference.com.

  6. 5 de fev. de 2024 · Connie Mack (born December 22/23, 1862, East Brookfield, Massachusetts, U.S.—died February 8, 1956, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) American professional baseball manager and team executive, the “grand old man” of the major leagues in the first half of the 20th century.