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  1. Sarah Charlotte, Lady Campbell-Bannerman (née Bruce; 10 May 1832 – 30 August 1906) was the wife of British Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman. Early life and marriage [ edit ] She was the daughter of Major-General Sir Charles Bruce, KCB , sometime Governor of Portsmouth , and his wife Charlotte, daughter of James Forbes, of ...

    • Sarah Charlotte Bruce, May 10, 1832
    • .mw-parser-output .marriage-line-margin2px{line-height:0;margin-bottom:-2px}.mw-parser-output .marriage-line-margin3px{line-height:0;margin-bottom:-3px}.mw-parser-output .marriage-display-ws{display:inline;white-space:nowrap}, Henry Campbell-Bannerman, ​ ​(m. .mw-parser-output .tooltip-dotted{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}1860)​
    • British
  2. He married Charlotte Bruce in 1860. She was a rather shy and homely lass, in later life in poor health and overweight, who shared Campbell-Bannerman’s tastes and views during a lifetime of mutual devotion. There were no children.

  3. Sir Henry Campbell-Bannerman GCB PC ( né Campbell; 7 September 1836 – 22 April 1908) was a British statesman and Liberal politician who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1905 to 1908 and Leader of the Liberal Party from 1899 to 1908. He also served as Secretary of State for War twice, in the cabinets of Gladstone and Rosebery.

  4. Kids Encyclopedia Facts. Sarah Charlotte, Lady Campbell-Bannerman ( née Bruce; 10 May 1832 – 30 August 1906) was the wife of British Prime Minister Henry Campbell-Bannerman. Early life and marriage.

  5. By 1906, Campbell-Bannerman’s wife, Charlotte, was very ill, and he dedicated a great deal of his time to caring for her. She died in August. Campbell-Bannerman’s health also began to deteriorate sharply at this time. By April 1908, his illness left him bedridden and he resigned, though he never left Downing Street, dying there 17 days later.

  6. Campbell-Bannerman’s government also successfully passed the Probation Act 1907, under which the courts were given the right to release offenders on probation. However, Campbell-Bannerman’s prime ministership was to be short-lived. His wife, Charlotte, died in 1906, and Campbell-Bannerman’s health declined.

  7. Charlotte Campbell Bannerman, his wife, ambitious for her husband, had previously influenced him to reject the idea of becoming Speaker, and instead to stand for the leadership of the Liberal Party. In his final discussion with Asquith on December , Campbell Ban -nerman said that he wished her (Charlotte) ‘to be the final arbiter’.