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  1. The Peerage of Great Britain comprises all extant peerages created in the Kingdom of Great Britain between the Acts of Union 1707 and the Acts of Union 1800. It replaced the Peerage of England and the Peerage of Scotland , but was itself replaced by the Peerage of the United Kingdom in 1801.

  2. The Peerage of the United Kingdom is one of the five Peerages in the United Kingdom. It comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801, when it replaced the Peerage of Great Britain.

    Title
    Creation
    Grantee
    Reason
    19 January 1801
    23 June 1801
    Earl Grey in the Peerage of United ...
    Earl Grey in the Peerage of United ...
    23 June 1801
    18 August 1801
    Earl Nelson in the Peerage of United ...
    Earl Nelson in the Peerage of United ...
    • Background
    • History of The Peerage
    • Types of Peers
    • Ranks
    • Precedence
    • Privilege of Peerage
    • Within The Honours System
    • Form of Title
    • Styles and Forms of Address
    • Vestments

    Peerages are created by the British monarch, like all Crown honours, being affirmed by letters patent affixed with the Great Seal of the Realm. His Majesty's Government in the United Kingdom makes recommendations to the Sovereign concerning who should be elevated to the peerage, after external vetting by the House of Lords Appointments Commission f...

    Baronage evolution

    The modern-day parliamentary peerage is a continuation of the renamed medieval baronage system which existed in feudal times. The modern peerage system is a vestige of the custom of English kings in the 12th and 13th centuries to grant a right to attend parliament; in the late 14th century, this right (or "title") began to be granted by decree, and titles also became inherited with the rest of an estate under the system of primogeniture. Feudalism was introduced to England after 1066 by Willi...

    England

    When William of Normandy conquered England, he divided the nation into many "manors", the owners of which came to be known as barons; those who held many manors were known as "greater barons", while those with fewer manors were the "lesser barons". Prior to the creation of the peerage, under the old system of feudalism some Lords had the authority to effectively create titles of their own (through powers like Subinfeudation), such as the Barony of Halton which was created by the Earl of Chest...

    Hereditary peers

    A hereditary peer is a peer of the realm whose dignity may be inherited; those able to inherit it are said to be "in remainder". Hereditary peerage dignities may be created with writs of summons or by letters patent; the former method is now obsolete. Writs of summons summon an individual to Parliament, in the old feudal tradition, and merely implied the existence or creation of an hereditary peerage dignity, which is automatically inherited, presumably according to the traditional medieval r...

    Representative peers

    From 1707 until 1963, Scottish peers elected 16 representative peers to sit in the House of Lords. Since 1963, they have had the same rights as Peers of the United Kingdom. From 1801 until 1922, Irish peers elected 28 representative peers to sit in the House of Lords. Since 1922, when the Irish Free Statebecame a separate country, no Irish representative peers have been elected, though sitting members retained their seats for life.

    Life peers

    Apart from hereditary peerages, there exist peerages that may be held for life and whose title cannot be passed onto someone else by inheritance. The Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876 and the Life Peerages Act 1958authorise the regular creation of life peerages, with the right to sit in the House of Lords. Life peers created under both acts are of baronial rank and are always created under letters patent. Since the loss of the right of hereditary peers to sit in the House of Lords as a result o...

    Peers are of five ranks, in descending order of hierarchy: 1. Duke comes from the Latin dux, meaning 'leader'. The first duke in a peerage of the British Isles was created in 1337. The feminine form is Duchess. 2. Marquess comes from the French marquis, which is a derivative of marche or march. This is a reference to the borders ('marches') between...

    Peers are entitled to a special precedencebecause of their ranks. Wives and children of peers are also entitled to a special precedence because of their station. The Sovereign may, as fount of honour, vary the precedence of the peers or of any other people. For example, Elizabeth II granted her husband, Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, precedence ...

    The privilege of peerage is the body of privileges that belongs to peers, their wives and their unremarried widows. The privilege is distinct from parliamentary privilege, and applies to all peers, not just members of the House of Lords. It still exists, although "occasions of its exercise have now diminished into obscurity." Although the extent of...

    The peerage forms part of the British honours system, as the highest tier. This role dates back to the days when being ennobled by the monarch meant secure addition for someone and their heirs into the British aristocracy, and alongside it, political power and a theoretically raised status within the hierarchy of the British class system. These day...

    The titles of peers are in the form of "(Rank) (TitleName)" or "(Rank) of (TitleName)". The name of the title can either be a place name or a surname or a combination of both (e.g. The Duke of Norfolk or The Earl Spencer). The precise usage depends on the rank of the peerage and on certain other general considerations. For instance, Dukes always us...

    Style

    Dukes use His Grace, Marquesses use The Most Honourable and other peers use The Right Honourable. Peeresses (whether they hold peerages in their own right or are wives of peers) use equivalent styles.

    Honorific

    Individuals who use the appellation Lord or Lady are not necessarily peers. There are judicial, ecclesiastic and holders of other crown offices who are often accorded the appellation "Lord" or "Lady" as a form of courtesy title as a product of their office. Those who hold feudal titles are however never accorded the honorific "Lord". The holder of a lordship of the manorfor example can be styled as Charles S, Lord/Lady of the Manor of [Placename], but would not be referred to as Lord Charles...

    Robes

    Peerage robes are currently worn in the United Kingdom on ceremonial occasions. They are of two varieties: parliament robes, worn in the House of Lords on occasions such as at a peer's introduction or state opening of parliament, and coronation robes, worn at the coronations of monarchs. The details of the fur on these robes differs according to a peer's rank. Since the early Middle Ages, robes have been worn as a sign of nobility. At first, these seem to have been bestowed on individuals by...

    Coronets and headgear

    In the United Kingdom, a peer wears his or her coronet on only one occasion: for the monarch's coronation, when it is worn along with coronation robes. 1. The coronet of a duke or duchess has eight strawberry leaves; 2. The coronet of a marquess or marchioness has four strawberry leaves and four silver balls (known as "pearls"); 3. The coronet of an earl or countess has eight strawberry leaves and eight "pearls" raised on stalks; 4. The coronet of a viscount or viscountess has sixteen "pearls...

  3. The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. In that year, the Peerages of England and Scotland were replaced by one Peerage of Great Britain. There are five peerages in the United Kingdom in total.

  4. The history of the British peerage, a system of nobility found in the United Kingdom, stretches over the last thousand years. The current form of the British peerage has been a process of development. While the ranks of baron and earl predate the British peerage itself, the ranks of duke and marquess were introduced to England in the 14th century.

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › PeeragePeerage - Wikipedia

    Peerage of Great Britain, holders of titles created in the Kingdom of Great Britain between 1707 and 1800 Peerage of Ireland, holders of Irish titles created by the Crown before 1920, until 1801 carrying a seat in the Irish House of Lords, some of whom later sat in the House of Lords at Westminster